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The Innovation Process
Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works in the real world, moving from controlled design and testing environments into complex humanitarian settings. In contrast to previous stages in the innovation...

Stage 4

Invention

To invent something is to “create or design something that has not existed before” (Oxford Dictionary). Although invention is often associated with ‘lightbulb’ moments, it is more frequently the result of a structured process involving...

Stage 3

Adaptation

As explained in our More Than Just Luck report, innovations in the humanitarian sector generally come from either a new idea (Invention) or from identifying changes that are necessary to repurpose existing products and services for use in a new...

Stage 2

Search

When you’ve identified a problem, the first step is to acknowledge that someone else has probably confronted the same issue and a solution might already exist. However, efforts to find out whether someone else has already found a solution are...

Stage 1

Recognition

Recognition should be the first stage of any innovation journey. It broadly consists of identifying a problem or opportunity to respond to, collecting and assessing readily available knowledge on the issue and context, diagnosing root causes, and...

Stage 6

Scale

If you have evidence that your solution is addressing a widespread need, scaling its use and increasing its impact could significantly reduce human suffering in humanitarian crises. We define scale as building on demonstrated successes to ensure...

Stage 5

Pilot

The objective of the Pilot stage is to learn whether, and how, your innovation works